Canadian Forum Literary Competitions/1920-12

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A Canadian at Harvard Canadian Forum Literary Competitions
1920-12
written by [[|]]
An Open Letter



Results of Competitions announced in November

A. — A Prize of five dollars for the best Limerick on Coal.

I have a friend who affirms that one writes most readily when one has a touch of fever. Whether or not we have to be thankful for the fact that grippe was prevalent in November, certain it is that the response to the November Competitions was gratifyingly large. But if the quantity of limericks submitted was satisfactory, the quality was distinctly disappointing. Perhaps ease is not conducive to masterpieces. The limericks were of two types, those in which 'hole' was rhymed with 'coal' and the rest of the limerick left to take care of itself, and those in which coal gained distinction as part of the contents of a cellar. Two limericks showed themselves free from these prevailing tendencies, a geological specimen, and another in simpler English. We print them below.

This product of age carboniferous
Is sold at a price that's too stiff for us.
So when wintry winds blow
'Neath the blankets we'll go
Or hike for some spot caloriferous.
W. M.

There once was a maid from Regina
Who to freezing could never resign her;
She put on all her wraps.
Mittens, bedsocks and caps,
Then she said, "I will marry a miner"
Winkle

The prize goes to "C. D." who writes from a sanatarium where coal is apparently an unknown quantity. We print the limerick below.


The Prize Limerick

It's rather ironic a rôle
That you give me — to write about Coal,
When you know that I freeze
At thirteen degrees,
Still the thought it Exists warms my soul.
C. D.

B. — A Prize of five dollars for the best Essay on Coincidences, in 800 words.

For some reason this competition failed to bring a ready response from our readers. Whether they are nearly all heretics on the subject of coincidences or whether some greater attraction, such as Thurston or Pavlowa, happened to coincide with the appearance of the Competitions' Page, we are left to guess. Contributions were few and none of them were of prize rank. An illustrative story by "G. B." is worthy of mention, but just fails to be good enough for printing. His sketch is somewhat too rambling and colloquial to qualify it for a prize. We hope we will hear from him again.